Jodhpur RIFF 11

By Kavi Bhansali And others divyakumarbhatia@gmail.com | 2011

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Ani Choying Drolma in Concert at dawn. She is profoundly admired across the world for the purity of her voice and her deep understanding of Buddhist scripture, meditation practices and a vast repertoire of hymns and chants. A monk and an artist, Ani la performs all over the world; her performance fees go to her independent foundation for young and destitute women in Kathmandu, the Nun’s Welfare Foundation and the Arya Tara School for girls.

Colours at dawn Sufi Gospel project. A serene and unusual blend of the Indian classical tradition of Bhakti (devotional) music, Indian instrumentation and Western gospel and Sufi music.

Stage and setting at the Opening Concert Clock Tower bazaar Jodhpur. The festival was held at Jodhpur from 12-16th October 2011.

Algoza Party at the opening concert. Detailed narrations are courtesy and copyright this site - http://www.jodhpurfolkfestival.org

Living legend Nemi Baba on the Algoza. Baba belongs to Bedham village in the Brij region of Rajasthan. He was a wrestler for most of his social life, renounced it for passion, left wordly possessions to wander in the forest outside his village at the age of 55. Baba says his Lord told him to do so. He spent the rest of his life in a small hut and a temple playing the algoza to his lord. He believes he only plays for his Lord and when he plays for an audience he sees the Lord in each of them. At the age of 108 he is the oldest active Rajasthani folk musician. His performance at RIFF this year will be the last in front of an audience.

Babunath Jogi on his Jogia Sarangi. Babunath is a 60 yr old man from Pathoda, Laxmangarh in Alwar district, belongs to the Goraknath sect. He has the unique ability to recite lengthy epics which are popular in Rajasthan, Haryana, M.P and Gujarat. He hails from a long generation of Jogis (app 500yrs). Jogis go through a formal training, they follow the guru-shishya method of learning. Ghisa Nath from Ramgarh is Babunath’s guru. Jogis traditionally are not invited to perform as they do on their own as they travel from place to place to share their knowledge. They recite epics on Shiv, Gopichand, Gogaji and many other folk deities. The jogi plays the jogia sarangi which is mostly accompanied by a bhapang.

Behroopiya.

"Dusk devotional concert with the Meghwal. The Meghwal are a Hindu community from the Marwar region in Rajasthan. The community of Megh or Meghwal is synonymous with the Bhambhi. The Meghwal are well known as an occupational group engaged in tanning of hides and also working as agricultural labourers. "

A relaxed audience at a dusk devotional Meghwal concert. Their saint is Ram Devji and they sing Bhajans for their deity in villages. Their main accompanying instrument is called `tandura’ a string instrument with a very distinctive sound and the jhanjh, a cymbal-like instrument. The Meghwal women of western Rajasthan are recognised as being very good weav\\ers.

An enthralled audience listens to Dharohar in concert. With an immense amount of expertise and enthusiasm, Dharohar takes you through a variety of textures and moods. It perfectly combines the soaring vocals of Sumitra, one of Rajasthan''s best-loved female singers, and the heart-wrenchingly beautiful voice of Sardar Khan and his sarangi, the perfect beats of dholak player Kutla Khan & compellingly energetic khartal artist Bhungar Khan, the rich vocals of traditional thespian Daya Ram, Dilip Bhatt and the witty and often controversial performance poet Jumma Khan, all complemented by the awesome Jason Singh''s irrepressible rhythm.

"Dharohar in concert. And if Jason Singh steps to the front of the stage with morchang (Jew''s harp ) talented Raies Khan, you''re in for something special. The close and complex combination of morchang and beatboxing would get any crowd jumping, anywhere in the world! "

Jason Singh leading the RIFF Rustle.

Davy Sicard and band and the Sharad Poornima moon.

Davy Sicard with the audience.

Bhanwaroo Khan, Daya Ram, Sumitra and Bundu Khan in concert.

Gevar, Shakarji and Darra Manganiyar on Kamaycha.

Fort Festivities with Chhattar Kotla and Kachchi Ghodi.

Fort Festivities with Derun dancers.

Joost on drums and Bhanwaroo on khartal.

Braj Ki Holi perfromers covered in flower petals Opening Concert Clock Tower bazaar.

Rajasthani Braj Ki Holi perfromers_Opening Concert_Clock Tower bazaar.

Rupa Mayra with Raies Khan and Bhungar Khan in concert.

Sampravaahi with Maharaja Gaj Singh of Jodhpur.

Rupa and The April Fishes with Queen Harish and a full house.

Yuri Honing and Bhanwroo Khan Langa_on stage.

Jumma Jogi Mewati in concert. A poet, vocalist and a bhapang artist from Alwar district, Jumma incorporates different local languages and writes songs and sings on current global issues with amazingly simple, but exciting rhythms. He comes from the fine and long tradition of the Jogis of Mewat, who have been well known for both their political and social commentary and their ballads.